• A Jack Snipe is readily identified in flight by its small size and shorter bill, bold golden braces, white trailing edge to secondaries and inner primaries and the lack of an orange band on the tail.
  • One of the highlights of the trip was seeing TWO Jack Snipes!
  • Much of the birding strategy on St. Paul Island in the fall is to walk the wild celery patches, where wayward passerines often lurk.
  • This pipit can be identified as an Olive-backed by the plain back, overall olive tones, and distinctive face pattern.
  • This Olive-backed Pipit was found on the first afternoon of our trip.
  • A resident of Alaska's spruce forests, this Townsend's Warbler was a bit out of place in the middle of the Bering Sea.
  • A Skylark, one of three we found on the tour, flies over showing its distinctive shape.
  • North America's first record of Pallas's Rosefinch was found in the quarry just a few days before our arrival. We tried several times to relocate it during our trip.
  • Seeing beaches full of northern fur seal female and pups was a real treat. On our spring tours, only the
  • This fur seal pup rests his head on lava rock worn smooth by thousands of years of seal use.
  • Few things are as cute as a northern fur seal pup!
  • Many years Pacific Wrens can be hard to find on St. Paul Island as their numbers fluctuate greatly and they're subject to large die-offs during harsh winters. This year, however, we found them commonly in a number of locations.
  • The Pribilof Islands race of Pacific Wren is larger and longer billed than most other races.
  • Another shot of the Siberian Rubythroat that was lurking in the tall grass near Big Lake.
  • This very frustrating Siberian Rubythroat was difficult to get a look at as it flushed from close range in tall grass.
  • A Northern Pintail does a flyby on Pumphouse Pond.
  • A Brambling was a fine addition to an evening foray.
  • A female northern fur seal poses in front of the town of St. Paul, Alaska.
  • This Dusky Thrush was a somewhat frustrating mega-rarity on our trip. It was only seen in flight as it flew past. The flight look was long and for those who saw it, looks were reasonable.
  • Another shot of the Dusky Thrush as it shows off its belly and underwing.
  • This Gyrfalcon took up residence on the island during our tour.

A few photo highlights from our first fall trip to the Pribilofs. All photos by Aaron Lang. Click on any photo for captions.

A full trip report can be found here.