• The rarest Asian bird of our trip was this striking and accommodating Red-flanked Bluetail!
  • A real poser, this Red-flanked Bluetail allowed for great looks!
  • A fluffy juvenile Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch.
  • Pacific Wrens on the Pribilof Islands are larger with longer tails and bills than mainland Alaskan wrens.
  • Adult Slaty-backed Gull, St. Paul Island, Alaska.
  • Vega Herring Gull, St. Paul Island, Alaska.
  • Red-faced Cormorant is the most common Cormorant on the Pribilofs, and the only one that nests.
  • The rarest of the cormorants in the Bering Sea, the Double-crested Cormorant is a casual stray to the Pribilofs.
  • American Pipit is a regular fall migrant at St. Paul Island. This is
  • This American Pipit is identified as the Asian form
  • We saw a small flock of Brambling in the quarry on several days during our tour.
  • A lone Brambling flies above the top of the quarry.
  • By far the rarest bird of our trip was a pair of hatch-year Cedar Waxwings--the first record for the Bering Sea!
  • By far the rarest bird of our trip was a pair of hatch-year Cedar Waxwings--the first record for the Bering Sea!
  • A Northern Fur Seal sits high atop Hutchinson Hill.
  • An immature and an adult Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch squabble for rusty turf.
  • This Gyrfalcon wandered widely over the island during our tour. We saw it on about half of the days.
  • The short-tailed, plain olive back, and unique face pattern identify this as an Olive-backed Pipit.
  • An Olive-backed Pipit was an exciting evening find on our tour!
  • The Pribilof Island race of Rock Sandpiper, nominate
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler is a rare but regular fall stray from mainland Alaska.

Our late September 2016 trip to the Pribilof Islands put a nice exclamation point on a great year of Alaskan birding tours! Here’s for a full tour report.

All photos by Aaron Lang. Click on any photo for captions.