• A Common Greenshank at Gambell. Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • This remarkably accommodating Chiffchaff, only the 5th record for North America, wowed birders in the boneyard on June 6th. Photo James Levison.
  • James captured this fantastic portrait of one of the trip's best birds, the fantastic Terek Sandpiper which was seen on both of our spring trips this year. Photo James Levison.
  • A Yellow-billed Loon flies by the point at Gambell, Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • Wood Sandpiper at Gambell, Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • Wandering Tattler at Gambell. Photo James Levison.
  • Terek Sandpiper in profile showing its long, up-turned bill. Photo James Levison.
  • A flight of Steller's Eiders by the point, Gambell, Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • A flight of Steller's Eiders by the point, Gambell, Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • Snow Bunting is a common breeding bird at Gambell. Photo James Levison.
  • Semipalmated Plover at Gambell, Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • Common Ringed Plover is a very rare breeder at Gambell. This male held territory at the south end of Troutman Lake. It is separated from the more numerous Semipalmated Plover by its paler upperparts, extensive white eyebrow, lack of an orange eye-ring, more extensive orange on the bill and by voice. Photo James Levison.
  • A male Common Ringed Plover in an aerial display at Gambell, Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • Tufted Puffin, Common Murre, and Steller's Eiders fly past the point at Gambell, Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • Birders bundled up on the point. Photo James Levison.
  • An adult Slaty-backed Gull at Gambell, Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • Red-necked Stint is a regular migrant at Gambell and most of our spring tours find one or two. Photo James Levison.
  • A striking male Northern Wheatear poses at Gambell, Alaska. Photo James Levison.
  • Lesser Sand-Plover is a subtle stunner. Photo James Levison.
  • Gray-cheeked Thrush is a trans-Beringian migrant. After wintering in the foothills of the Andes a few make the long journey to the Russian Far East where in the spring they cross paths with east bound Bluethroats, Northern Wheatears and Arctic Warblers. Photo James Levison.

While birding Gambell we always hope for west winds and the exotic birds they might bring. Each trip is different and our fortunes rely heavily on a blend of luck, hard work, and perseverance. This spring we had a bit of all three and also had the photographic expertise of participant James Levison to document the trip. Thanks, James, for sharing your wonderful photos! Click on any photo to begin the slide show with captions.