• Crested Auklets are abundant breeding birds on Saint Lawrence Island.
  • Birders enjoy a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at their feet.
  • Two Siberian Accentors call on the rocks near the Far Boneyard at Gambell, St. Lawrence Island, Alaska.
  • Juvenile Ruddy Turnstones gather on the north end of Troutman Lake at Gambell.
  • The first rays of sun hit Sivuqaq Mountain on Gambell.
  • Juvenile Snow Bunting at Gambell, Alaska.
  • A Siberian Accentor looks quite at home on the rocks near the Far Boneyard.
  • Siberian Accentors are not-quite-annual visitors to Gambell. This was one of two that we found on our recent tour.
  • The island's birders gather for the early morning seawatch.
  • Red-throated Pipits are regular fall migrants at Gambell. Here two spar over a bit turf.
  • Two Horned Larks of the Asian subspecies
  • The Asian subspecies of Horned Lark,
  • This Gray-tailed Tattler greeted our group just 15 minutes after their arrival at Gambell!
  • Juvenile Gray-tailed Tattlers are more heavily spotted above than juvenile Wandering Tattlers.
  • A young Glaucous Gull flys by the point.
  • The Gray-cheeked Thrushes that pass through Gambell each fall are departing their nesting grounds in the Russian Far East en route to the tropical forests in the foothills of the Andes Mountains in South America.
  • It can be difficult to find birds on the foggy days on Gambell. But we bird nonetheless.
  • Bluethroats are regular spring and fall migrants on Saint Lawrence Island.

We’ve just returned home from another great trip to St. Lawrence Island. Despite a long stretch of northerlies which limited the potential for Asian strays, our 11 days on St. Lawrence Island combined a fascinating mix of birds, culture, and a fantastic group of hearty birders. Even when the birding is slow, Gambell continues to amaze and remains one of our favorite destinations. Photos by Aaron Lang. Click on any photo for captions.